How to Avoid Making a Speech and Body-language Faux Pas That May Harm a Global Business Relationship


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The Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC), comprised of successful entrepreneurs 40 and younger, says that thanks to today’s global connectivity and communication technology, the business world is increasingly international. They go on to say that many business leaders, even small business owners, can now easily and seamlessly conduct business across the globe.

In the article below, a panel of YEC members explain with 10 points how to avoid making speech and body-language faux pas that might harm global business relationships.

  1. Do Your Homework On Diversity And World Cultures
  2. Be A Genuine, Decent Person
  3. Be Observant And Open To New Cultural Experiences
  4. Ask Your Business Contacts To Correct You
  5. Keep Your Reactions, Word Choices And Tone Of Voice In Check
  6. Avoid Humor
  7. Conduct Cultural Awareness Meetings With Your Team
  8. Mirror The Person You’re Speaking With
  9. Make Time To Study Global Cultural Etiquette
  10. Just Be Yourself And Be Real

To help you feel more comfortable and confident in your global interactions, read on.

Create Something New Everyday and Watch it Go Global


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Here’s the sweet, creative story.

36 Days of Type, a global design challenge that now partners with Adobe, started as a personal project that went global after Nina Sans and Rafa Goicoechea, both graphic designers from Barcelona, first decided to challenge themselves to create something new everyday, as a way to experiment with new stuff outside their comfort zone by setting personal daily design challenges.

This year [2019], the project asked designers everywhere to come up with visual interpretations of the letters A through Z, and the numbers 0 through 9, and share them on social media between April 2 and May 8.

McKinsey Design got involved.  Almost 50 designers and graphic artists from across the firm, including client and non-client facing colleagues alike, volunteered to submit artwork. You can see all of their pieces right now, along with captions explaining their process or inspiration, at McKinsey Design’s Instagram account.

Look closer at where a creative journey can lead you and it’s probably where you least expect it.

Today in Global Small Business: If You Want to Lift Up Humanity, Empower Women


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What’s affecting me, my clients, my colleagues and other global small business owners:

  • Anytime is a good time to expand a business internationally.  Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.
  • Quote of the week:  “If you want to lift up humanity, empower women.  It is the most comprehensive, pervasive, high-leverage investment you can make in human beings.” – Melinda Gates
  • With global sales among franchisees doubling to $2 billion over the last five years, Waco-based Neighborly has become a household name.
  • Entrepreneurs burn out and often walk away from their businesses before they reach the success levels they so longed to reach. They give up just before things “take off” in their business.  Find out why and what to do about it.
  • Global trade and exportation of such good is an intricate, complex, and often difficult task that hinges on financing; trade financing.  Trade financing, much like many forms of credit providing, is a key component of the success of small to medium enterprises (SMEs), but that key is not always easy to obtain.  Learn how blockchain-based trade financing is playing into the equation.
  • India is looking to fight a lonely battle on global rules for e-commerce trade at the World Trade Organization (WTO) with close to 70 countries siding with the US to have a multilateral mechanism.    

With a Digital Presence, Small Businesses Can Grow Global


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Jersey Business is expanding its presence from local – mechanics, hairdressers and electricians – to an off-island customer base that enables them to thrive, globally.

A number of our [says Alexia McClure, head of operations, Jersey Business] successful stores have a digital presence, particularly on social media, which allows them to sell to the UK and further afield. These sales enable our favourite outlets to be financially sustainable and, as a result, we, their local customers, benefit from their ability to maintain a vibrant offering.

It is a fact:  Many of these businesses think internationally right from the start.

McClure goes on to say:

“I think the breadth of Jersey’s existing exporting success has only just come to my attention because it is only in the past 12 months that we have really started to develop our support for businesses selling internationally.”

Why limit your ambition when the world is there at your feet?

For Jersey and NY business owners, feel free to register for an export seminar on 7/18 that helps you develop a digital presence.

Free-of-Charge Cybersecurity Toolkit for Global Small Businesses


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When it comes to cybercrime the risks are great, especially for small businesses that are the lifeblood of the global economy.

The statistics, according to the World Economic Foum (WEF) show that 58% of cybercrime targets small businesses, with the global cost of cybercrime standing at $600 billion in 2018.

What many people don’t know, however, is that small businesses are often the easy way into larger enterprises. Attackers will, for example, gain access to the credentials of a small business in the supply chain of a large enterprise as a pathway into the larger company, and the breach will often go unnoticed until after the attack has been carried out.

Read more about how helping small businesses fight cybercrime benefits the global ecosystem.

Tip of the day:  The GCA Cybersecurity Toolkit for Small Business enables smaller firms to navigate the confusing array of advice free of charge, to help them shore up their cyber defenses and reduce their cyber risk.

Let’s all work together to fight cybercrime on a global scale!

Today in Global Small Business: The Future of the Norwegian Startup Ecosystem


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What’s affecting me, my clients, my colleagues and other global small business owners:

Global Startup Ecosystem Report


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Europe leads in the “number of top growing ecosystems across phases,” says a recently released report Startup Genome’s 2019 Global Startup Ecosystem Report.

The Global Startup Ecosystem Report is “based on primary and secondary data from over 10,000 founders and more than one million companies across over 150 cities worldwide,” according to the authors, Startup Genome and the Global Entrepreneurship Network.

Amongst the top 10 global startup ecosystems, Paris and Berlin have the least amount of female founders.

Four key takeaways from the report:

  1. Paris and Berlin to step up female entrepreneurship
  2. Frankfurt’s Fintech focus
  3. Blockchain in the Balkans
  4. Keep your eye on Helsinki

Read more about the takeaways from the Global Startup Ecosystem Report.

The Coca Cola Company Is Proof That Small Businesses Can Go Global


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For a business that was started as a concoction experiment and has survived different strategic transitions, one can say that The Coca Cola Company is a testament that small businesses can go global.

In 2018, The Coca Cola Company raked about 31.9b dollars in revenue. Recognized as a top ten private employer, providing a means of livelihood to more than 700,000 people. 

In your quest to expand, founders should not neglect virtues like persistence and patience because the journey is an adventure. Even The Coca Cola Company realized this.

Read more about how small businesses still go global.

Today in Global Small Business: Create a Winning Global Marketing Strategy


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What’s affecting me, my clients, my colleagues and other global small business owners: